Romance Research Resources

Some of the resources I rely on when researching romance history.

FictionDB

FictionDB is the first place I go when I’m looking to research an author, or a title, or even a whole line. Think Goodreads, but usable. It’s not perfect, but if you’re looking for details about a romance title published in the last 50 or 60 years, this is the place to start.

Teach Me Tonight

Teach Me Tonight is an amazing resource for scholars of romance fiction. Run by several of the biggest names in the field- Pamela Regis, Eric Selinger, and Laura Vivanco- the site provides regular updates on developments in romance research, upcoming conferences and publications, as well as resources for those teaching the genre.

Romance on TV

Romance on TV is a YouTube playlist I’ve been curating, consisting mainly of clips, interviews, and commercials related to romance fiction from the 1970s, 80s and 90s. The idea is to capture clips that may escape notice regularly but will still be of interest to those studying the genre.


AbeBooks

If you’re looking to start collecting older romances, AbeBooks is a great place to start. You’ll be instantly browsing used bookstores from around the world, and the prices are usually pretty reasonable. It’s also a good place to look for titles just to get a sense of what the market think they’re worth.

Romance Wiki

After a hiatus, the Romance Wiki is back online. This is an invaluable resource for the community to use and contribute to, so make sure you pitch in!

AbeBooks

If you’re looking to start collecting older romances, AbeBooks is a great place to start. You’ll be instantly browsing used bookstores from around the world, and the prices are usually pretty reasonable. It’s also a good place to look for titles just to get a sense of what the market think they’re worth.

Journal of Popular Romance Studies

JPRS is the journal of the International Association for the Study of Popular Romance, and the only journal solely devoted to the genre and its environs. Importantly, it’s open access, so it’s fully available to independent researches and those outside academia who are interested in the study of romance.

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